With great pleasure and enjoyment I want to welcome you to our October newsletter. It has been a great pleasure to meet with you during our annual adjunct and visiting faculty meeting. On behalf of IE Business School I want again to congratulate to all our adjunct and visiting faculty that received a teaching award of the academic year 2009-2010. In this occasion we have a special guest for our editorial, Mr. Santiago Iñiguez President of IE University and Dean of IE Business School. I invite you cordially to read his very important message.

Our mission is to prepare competent managers and entrepreneurs with an international orientation and respect to their duties as global citizens. In my opinion, a basic requirement to reinforce these global values in students is to provide an atmosphere that makes cheating very difficult and very risky. In their combat against cheating, business schools officials should not transfer the entire responsibility to students, but rather involve other school stakeholders, docents in particular. A whole set of measures, which I commented in my blog www.deanstalk.net before, should be displayed in order to combat cheating, including the adoption of preventive measures along the publication of a list of condemned practices as well as the existence of effective bodies that decide and implement the sanctions.

Enactment of Honour Codes. The surveys released by the Center for Academic Integrity (CAI) show that “cheating on campuses with honor codes is typically 1/3 to 1/2 lower than the level on campuses that do not have honor codes”. As you probably know, students at IE master degree programmes are asked to endorse a Honour Code at the beginning of the their course.

Involve students in the ethical governance bodies. Half of our ethics committee is made up of students making the agreed-on sanctions more legitimate in the eyes of students. At IE we see as key that the student knows the technical means we have at our disposal to prevent cheating (see “Technical Solutions” below). Nobody likes to have to tell a student that they have to leave the course, with the extreme financial discomfort that this would entail etc. We hope to dissuade rather then having to catch and punish students after the act. All this creates an environment where honesty and endeavour are the key elements that resonate; all resulting in a critical mass of fair play.

Empowering and improving the conscientiousness of faculty. According to CAI, faculty members are normally reluctant to take action against suspected cheaters. “In Assessment Project surveys involving almost 10,000 faculty in the last three years, 44% of those who were aware of student cheating in their course in the last three years, have never reported a student for cheating to the appropriate campus authority. Students suggest that cheating is higher in courses where it is well known that faculty members are likely to ignore cheating”.

Balance the load of assignment to students. This may seem obvious but at times it might seem outrageous the workload that students are asked to do in some schools. In some cases this creates the sense of desperation necessary for some students to cross the line.

Technical Solutions. As you may know, IE professors can use a Web based application called Turnitin to verify that our students are not plagiarising when handing in written assignments etc. Use of this tool sends a strong message that we take seriously the protection of the honest competively-minded student and this has a spill-over effect in the approach to other tasks, such as exams and presentations etc.

I kindly ask you to support these initiatives and to help us to eradicate cheating practices in the learning process at our school. It is in the interest of all stakeholders, mostly the students.

Ou

Our mission is to prepare competent managers and entrepreneurs with an international orientation and respect to their duties as global citizens. In my opinion, a basic requirement to reinforce these

global values in students is to provide an atmosphere that makes cheating very difficult and very risky. In their combat against cheating, business schools officials should not transfer the entire responsibility to students, but rather involve other school stakeholders, docents in particular. A whole set of measures, which I commented in my blog www.deanstalk.net before, should be displayed in order to combat cheating, including the adoption of preventive measures along the publication of a list of condemned practices as well as the existence of effective bodies that decide and implement the sanctions.

Enactment of Honour Codes. The surveys released by the Center for Academic Integrity (CAI) show that “cheating on campuses with honor codes is typically 1/3 to 1/2 lower than the level on campuses that do not have honor codes”. As you probably know, students at IE master degree programmes are asked to endorse a Honour Code at the beginning of the their course.

Involve students in the ethical governance bodies. Half of our ethics committee is made up of students making the agreed-on sanctions more legitimate in the eyes of students. At IE we see as key that the student knows the technical means we have at our disposal to prevent cheating (see “Technical Solutions” below). Nobody likes to have to tell a student that they have to leave the course, with the extreme financial discomfort that this would entail etc. We hope to dissuade rather then having to catch and punish students after the act. All this creates an environment where honesty and endeavour are the key elements that resonate; all resulting in a critical mass of fair play.

Empowering and improving the conscientiousness of faculty. According to CAI, faculty members are normally reluctant to take action against suspected cheaters. “In Assessment Project surveys involving almost 10,000 faculty in the last three years, 44% of those who were aware of student cheating in their course in the last three years, have never reported a student for cheating to the appropriate campus authority. Students suggest that cheating is higher in courses where it is well known that faculty members are likely to ignore cheating”.

Balance the load of assignment to students. This may seem obvious but at times it might seem outrageous the workload that students are asked to do in some schools. In some cases this creates the sense of desperation necessary for some students to cross the line.

Technical Solutions. As you may know, IE professors can use a Web based application called Turnitin to verify that our students are not plagiarising when handing in written assignments etc. Use of this tool sends a strong message that we take seriously the protection of the honest competively-minded student and this has a spill-over effect in the approach to other tasks, such as exams and presentations etc.

I kindly ask you to support these initiatives and to help us to eradicate cheating practices in the learning process at our school. It is in the interest of all stakeholders, mostly the students.

Our mission is to prepare competent managers and entrepreneurs with an international orientation and respect to their duties as global citizens. In my opinion, a basic requirement to reinforce these

global values in students is to provide an atmosphere that makes cheating very difficult and very risky. In their combat against cheating, business schools officials should not transfer the entire responsibility to students, but rather involve other school stakeholders, docents in particular. A whole set of measures, which I commented in my blog www.deanstalk.net before, should be displayed in order to combat cheating, including the adoption of preventive measures along the publication of a list of condemned practices as well as the existence of effective bodies that decide and implement the sanctions.

Enactment of Honour Codes. The surveys released by the Center for Academic Integrity (CAI) show that “cheating on campuses with honor codes is typically 1/3 to 1/2 lower than the level on campuses that do not have honor codes”. As you probably know, students at IE master degree programmes are asked to endorse a Honour Code at the beginning of the their course.

Involve students in the ethical governance bodies. Half of our ethics committee is made up of students making the agreed-on sanctions more legitimate in the eyes of students. At IE we see as key that the student knows the technical means we have at our disposal to prevent cheating (see “Technical Solutions” below). Nobody likes to have to tell a student that they have to leave the course, with the extreme financial discomfort that this would entail etc. We hope to dissuade rather then having to catch and punish students after the act. All this creates an environment where honesty and endeavour are the key elements that resonate; all resulting in a critical mass of fair play.

Empowering and improving the conscientiousness of faculty. According to CAI, faculty members are normally reluctant to take action against suspected cheaters. “In Assessment Project surveys involving almost 10,000 faculty in the last three years, 44% of those who were aware of student cheating in their course in the last three years, have never reported a student for cheating to the appropriate campus authority. Students suggest that cheating is higher in courses where it is well known that faculty members are likely to ignore cheating”.

Balance the load of assignment to students. This may seem obvious but at times it might seem outrageous the workload that students are asked to do in some schools. In some cases this creates the sense of desperation necessary for some students to cross the line.

Technical Solutions. As you may know, IE professors can use a Web based application called Turnitin to verify that our students are not plagiarising when handing in written assignments etc. Use of this tool sends a strong message that we take seriously the protection of the honest competively-minded student and this has a spill-over effect in the approach to other tasks, such as exams and presentations etc.

I kindly ask you to support these initiatives and to help us to eradicate cheating practices in the learning process at our school. It is in the interest of all stakeholders, mostly the students.

r mission is to prepare competent managers and entrepreneurs with an international orientation and respect to their duties as global citizens. In my opinion, a basic requirement to reinforce these

global values in students is to provide an atmosphere that makes cheating very difficult and very risky. In their combat against cheating, business schools officials should not transfer the entire responsibility to students, but rather involve other school stakeholders, docents in particular. A whole set of measures, which I commented in my blog www.deanstalk.net before, should be displayed in order to combat cheating, including the adoption of preventive measures along the publication of a list of condemned practices as well as the existence of effective bodies that decide and implement the sanctions.

Enactment of Honour Codes. The surveys released by the Center for Academic Integrity (CAI) show that “cheating on campuses with honor codes is typically 1/3 to 1/2 lower than the level on campuses that do not have honor codes”. As you probably know, students at IE master degree programmes are asked to endorse a Honour Code at the beginning of the their course.

Involve students in the ethical governance bodies. Half of our ethics committee is made up of students making the agreed-on sanctions more legitimate in the eyes of students. At IE we see as key that the student knows the technical means we have at our disposal to prevent cheating (see “Technical Solutions” below). Nobody likes to have to tell a student that they have to leave the course, with the extreme financial discomfort that this would entail etc. We hope to dissuade rather then having to catch and punish students after the act. All this creates an environment where honesty and endeavour are the key elements that resonate; all resulting in a critical mass of fair play.

Empowering and improving the conscientiousness of faculty. According to CAI, faculty members are normally reluctant to take action against suspected cheaters. “In Assessment Project surveys involving almost 10,000 faculty in the last three years, 44% of those who were aware of student cheating in their course in the last three years, have never reported a student for cheating to the appropriate campus authority. Students suggest that cheating is higher in courses where it is well known that faculty members are likely to ignore cheating”.

Balance the load of assignment to students. This may seem obvious but at times it might seem outrageous the workload that students are asked to do in some schools. In some cases this creates the sense of desperation necessary for some students to cross the line.

Technical Solutions. As you may know, IE professors can use a Web based application called Turnitin to verify that our students are not plagiarising when handing in written assignments etc. Use of this tool sends a strong message that we take seriously the protection of the honest competively-minded student and this has a spill-over effect in the approach to other tasks, such as exams and presentations etc.

I kindly ask you to support these initiatives and to help us to eradicate cheating practices in the learning process at our school. It is in the interest of all stakeholders, mostly the students.

With

Our mission is to prepare competent managers and entrepreneurs with an international orientation and respect to their duties as global citizens. In my opinion, a basic requirement to reinforce these

global values in students is to provide an atmosphere that makes cheating very difficult and very risky. In their combat against cheating, business schools officials should not transfer the entire responsibility to students, but rather involve other school stakeholders, docents in particular. A whole set of measures, which I commented in my blog www.deanstalk.net before, should be displayed in order to combat cheating, including the adoption of preventive measures along the publication of a list of condemned practices as well as the existence of effective bodies that decide and implement the sanctions.

Enactment of Honour Codes. The surveys released by the Center for Academic Integrity (CAI) show that “cheating on campuses with honor codes is typically 1/3 to 1/2 lower than the level on campuses that do not have honor codes”. As you probably know, students at IE master degree programmes are asked to endorse a Honour Code at the beginning of the their course.

Involve students in the ethical governance bodies. Half of our ethics committee is made up of students making the agreed-on sanctions more legitimate in the eyes of students. At IE we see as key that the student knows the technical means we have at our disposal to prevent cheating (see “Technical Solutions” below). Nobody likes to have to tell a student that they have to leave the course, with the extreme financial discomfort that this would entail etc. We hope to dissuade rather then having to catch and punish students after the act. All this creates an environment where honesty and endeavour are the key elements that resonate; all resulting in a critical mass of fair play.

Empowering and improving the conscientiousness of faculty. According to CAI, faculty members are normally reluctant to take action against suspected cheaters. “In Assessment Project surveys involving almost 10,000 faculty in the last three years, 44% of those who were aware of student cheating in their course in the last three years, have never reported a student for cheating to the appropriate campus authority. Students suggest that cheating is higher in courses where it is well known that faculty members are likely to ignore cheating”.

Balance the load of assignment to students. This may seem obvious but at times it might seem outrageous the workload that students are asked to do in some schools. In some cases this creates the sense of desperation necessary for some students to cross the line.

Technical Solutions. As you may know, IE professors can use a Web based application called Turnitin to verify that our students are not plagiarising when handing in written assignments etc. Use of this tool sends a strong message that we take seriously the protection of the honest competively-minded student and this has a spill-over effect in the approach to other tasks, such as exams and presentations etc.

I kindly ask you to support these initiatives and to help us to eradicate cheating practices in the learning process at our school. It is in the interest of all stakeholders, mostly the students.

With great pleasure

http://vdcav.en.blogs.ie.edu/files/2010/10/DSC0144-1024x680.jpg Our mission is to prepare competent managers and entrepreneurs with an international orientation and respect to their duties as global citizens. In my opinion, a basic requirement to reinforce these

global values in students is to provide an atmosphere that makes cheating very difficult and very risky. In their combat against cheating, business schools officials should not transfer the entire responsibility to students, but rather involve other school stakeholders, docents in particular. A whole set of measures, which I commented in my blog www.deanstalk.net before, should be displayed in order to combat cheating, including the adoption of preventive measures along the publication of a list of condemned practices as well as the existence of effective bodies that decide and implement the sanctions.

Enactment of Honour Codes. The surveys released by the Center for Academic Integrity (CAI) show that “cheating on campuses with honor codes is typically 1/3 to 1/2 lower

than the level on campuses that do not have honor codes”. As you probably know, students at IE master degree programmes are asked to endorse a Honour Code at the beginning of the their course.

Involve students in the ethical governance bodies. Half of our ethics committee is made up of students making the agreed-on sanctions more legitimate in the eyes of students. At IE we see as key that the student knows the technical means we have at our disposal to prevent cheating (see “Technical Solutions” below). Nobody likes to have to tell a student that they have to leave the course, with the extreme financial discomfort that this would entail etc. We hope to dissuade rather then having to catch and punish students after the act. All this creates an environment where honesty and endeavour are the key elements that resonate; all resulting in a critical mass of fair play.

Empowering and improving the conscientiousness of faculty. According to CAI, faculty members are normally reluctant to take action against suspected cheaters. “In Assessment Project surveys involving almost 10,000 faculty in the last three years, 44% of those who were aware of student cheating in their course in the last three years, have never reported a student for cheating to the appropriate campus authority. Students suggest that cheating is higher in courses where it is well known that faculty members are likely to ignore cheating”.

Balance the load of assignment to students. This may seem obvious but at times it might seem outrageous the workload that students are asked to do in some schools. In some cases this creates the sense of desperation necessary for some students to cross the line.

Technical Solutions. As you may know, IE professors can use a Web based application called Turnitin to verify that our students are not plagiarising when handing in written assignments etc. Use of this tool sends a strong message that we take seriously the protection of the honest competively-minded student and this has a spill-over effect in the approach to other tasks, such as exams and presentations etc.

I kindly ask you to support these initiatives and to help us to eradicate cheating practices in the learning process at our school. It is in the interest of all stakeholders, mostly the students.

http://vdcav.en.blogs.ie.edu/files/2010/10/DSC0144-1024x680.jpg Our mission is to prepare competent managers and entrepreneurs with an international orientation and respect to their duties as global citizens. In my opinion, a basic requirement to reinforce these

global values in students is to provide an atmosphere that makes cheating very difficult and very risky. In their combat against cheating, business schools officials should not transfer the entire responsibility to students, but rather involve other school stakeholders, docents in particular. A whole set of measures, which I commented in my blog www.deanstalk.net before, should be displayed in order to combat cheating, including the adoption of preventive measures along the publication of a list of condemned practices as well as the existence of effective bodies that decide and implement the sanctions.

Enactment of Honour Codes. The surveys released by the Center for Academic Integrity (CAI) show that “cheating on campuses with honor codes is typically 1/3 to 1/2 lower

than the level on campuses that do not have honor codes”. As you probably know, students at IE master degree programmes are asked to endorse a Honour Code at the beginning of the their course.

Involve students in the ethical governance bodies. Half of our ethics committee is made up of students making the agreed-on sanctions more legitimate in the eyes of students. At IE we see as key that the student knows the technical means we have at our disposal to prevent cheating (see “Technical Solutions” below). Nobody likes to have to tell a student that they have to leave the course, with the extreme financial discomfort that this would entail etc. We hope to dissuade rather then having to catch and punish students after the act. All this creates an environment where honesty and endeavour are the key elements that resonate; all resulting in a critical mass of fair play.

Empowering and improving the conscientiousness of faculty. According to CAI, faculty members are normally reluctant to take action against suspected cheaters. “In Assessment Project surveys involving almost 10,000 faculty in the last three years, 44% of those who were aware of student cheating in their course in the last three years, have never reported a student for cheating to the appropriate campus authority. Students suggest that cheating is higher in courses where it is well known that faculty members are likely to ignore cheating”.

Balance the load of assignment to students. This may seem obvious but at times it might seem outrageous the workload that students are asked to do in some schools. In some cases this creates the sense of desperation necessary for some students to cross the line.

Technical Solutions. As you may know, IE professors can use a Web based application called Turnitin to verify that our students are not plagiarising when handing in written assignments etc. Use of this tool sends a strong message that we take seriously the protection of the honest competively-minded student and this has a spill-over effect in the approach to other tasks, such as exams and presentations etc.

I kindly ask you to support these initiatives and to help us to eradicate cheating practices in the learning process at our school. It is in the interest of all stakeholders, mostly the students.

and enjoyment I want to welcome you to our October newsletter. It has been a great pleasure to meet you during our annual adjunct and visiting faculty meeting. On behalf of IE Business School I want again to congratulate to all our adjunct and visiting faculty that received a teaching award for their outstanding work leading the teaching process during our academic year 2009-2010. In this occasion we have a special guest for our editorial, Mr. Santiago Iñiguez President of IE University and Dean of IE Business School. I invite you cordially to read his very important message for us as faculty since it is part of one of our important priorities at our business school. great pleasure and enjoyment I want to welcome you to our October newsletter. It has been a great pleasure and enjoyment to meet you during our annual adjunct and visiting faculty meeting. On behalf of IE Business School I want again to congratulate to all our adjunct and visiting faculty that receive a teaching award for their outstanding work leading the leading process during our academic year 2009-2010. In this occasion we have a special guest for our editorial, Mr. Santiago Iñiguez President of IE University and Dean of IE Business School. I invite you cordially to read his very important message for us as faculty since it is part of one of our important priorities at our business school.

With great pleasure and enjoyment I want to welcome you to our October newsletter. It has been a great pleasure and enjoyment to meet you during our annual adjunct and visiting faculty meeting. On behalf of IE Business School I want again to congratulate to all our adjunct and visiting faculty that receive a teaching award for their outstanding work leading the leading process during our academic year 2009-2010. In this occasion we have a special guest for our editorial, Mr. Santiago Iñiguez President of IE University and Dean of IE Business School. I invite you cordially to read his very important message for us as faculty since it is part of one of our important priorities at our business school.

With great pleas

With great pleasure and enjoyment I want to welcome you to our October newsletter. It has been a great pleasure and enjoyment to meet you during our annual adjunct and visiting faculty meeting. On behalf of IE Business School I want again to congratulate to all our adjunct and visiting faculty that receive a teaching award for their outstanding work leading the leading process during our academic year 2009-2010. In this occasion we have a special guest for our editorial, Mr. Santiago Iñiguez President of IE University and Dean of IE Business School. I invite you cordially to read his very important message for us as faculty since it is part of one of our important priorities at our business school.

With great pleasure and enjoyment I want to welcome you to our October newsletter. It has been a great pleasure and enjoyment to meet you during our annual adjunct and visiting faculty meeting. On behalf of IE Business School I want again to congratulate to all our adjunct and visiting faculty that receive a teaching award for their outstanding work leading the leading process during our academic year 2009-2010. In this occasion we have a special guest for our editorial, Mr. Santiago Iñiguez President of IE University and Dean of IE Business School. I invite you cordially to read his very important message for us as faculty since it is part of one of our important priorities at our business school.

With great pleasure and enjoyment I want to welcome you to our October newsletter. It has been a great pleasure and enjoyment to meet you during our annual adjunct and visiting faculty meeting. On behalf of IE Business School I want again to congratulate to all our adjunct and visiting faculty that receive a teaching award for their outstanding work leading the leading process during our academic year 2009-2010. In this occasion we have a special guest for our editorial, Mr. Santiago Iñiguez President of IE University and Dean of IE Business School. I invite you cordially to read his very important message for us as faculty since it is part of one of our important priorities at our business school.

ure and enjoyment I want to welcome you to our October newsletter. It has been a great pleasure and enjoyment to meet you during our annual adjunct and visiting faculty meeting. On behalf of IE Business School I want again to congratulate to all our adjunct and visiting faculty that receive a teaching award for their outstanding work leading the leading process during our academic year 2009-2010. In this occasion we have a special guest for our editorial, Mr. Santiago Iñiguez President of IE University and Dean of IE Business School. I invite you cordially to read his very important message for us as faculty since it is part of one of our important priorities at our business school.